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dc.contributor.advisorHenderson, James W.
dc.contributor.authorJamal, Sheri K.
dc.contributor.otherBaylor University. Dept. of Economics.en
dc.date.accessioned2006-10-26T19:00:44Z
dc.date.available2006-10-26T19:00:44Z
dc.date.copyright2006-08
dc.date.issued2006-10-26T19:00:44Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2104/4825
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 48-50).en
dc.description.abstractPolicy makers, insurance companies, physicians, healthcare administrators, and especially patients have acknowledged the need for healthcare reform. Some economists speculate high healthcare costs arise from charging paying patients enough to cover patients whom are unable to pay, the majority of those being uninsured. Hispanics maintain the highest percentage of uninsured, thirty percent; therefore are the main focus of this study. I hypothesize that assimilation and race, compared to many common factors play a significant role in health insurance. Not only do the results show Hispanics to be significantly less likely to have health insurance than blacks or whites, but immigrants are less likely to be insured than the first generation resident or subsequent generations. Specifically, Hispanic immigrants are less likely to be insured than white immigrants from 1980-1990. This study concludes that assimilation is a significant determinant of the percentage of the United States population that is uninsured.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Sheri K. Jamal.en
dc.format.extentvii, 50 p. : ill.en
dc.format.extent1615007 bytes
dc.format.extent332662 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.rightsBaylor University theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. Contact librarywebmaster@baylor.edu for inquiries about permission.en
dc.subjectMedically uninsured persons --- United States.en
dc.subjectInsurance, Health --- United States.en
dc.subjectLatin Americans --- United States -- Cultural assimilation.en
dc.subjectHispanic Americans -- Cultural Assimiliation.en
dc.titleHispanic assimilation to American health insurance.en
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.degreeM.S.Eco.en
dc.rights.accessrightsWorldwide access.en
dc.rights.accessrightsAccess changed. 11/4/08
dc.contributor.departmentEconomics.en


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