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dc.contributor.advisorConaway, Betty J.
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Edith G.
dc.contributor.otherBaylor University. Dept. of Curriculum and Instruction.en
dc.date.accessioned2008-04-15T17:40:19Z
dc.date.available2008-04-15T17:40:19Z
dc.date.copyright2007
dc.date.issued2008-04-15T17:40:19Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2104/5125
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 241-258).en
dc.description.abstractThe pilot study compared the effectiveness of using an experimental spiral physics curriculum to a traditional linear physics curriculum for sixth through eighth grades. The study also surveyed students' parents and principals about students' academic history and background as well as identified resilient children's attributes for academic success. The pilot study was used to help validate the testing instrument as well as help refine the complete study. The purpose of the complete study was to compare the effectiveness of using an experimental spiral physics curriculum and a traditional linear curriculum with sixth graders only; seventh and eighth graders were dropped in the complete study. The study also surveyed students' parents, teachers, and principals about students' academic history and background as well as identified resilient children's attributes for academic success. Both the experimental spiral physics curriculum and the traditional linear physics curriculum increased physics achievement; however, there was no statistically significant difference in effectiveness of teaching experimental spiral physics curriculum in the aggregated sixth grade group compared to the traditional linear physics curriculum. It is important to note that the majority of the subgroups studied did show statistically significant differences in effectiveness for the experimental spiral physics curriculum compared to the traditional linear physics curriculum. The Grounded Theory analysis of resilient student characteristics resulted in categories for future studies including the empathy factor ("E" factor), the tenacity factor ("T" factor),the relational factor ("R" factor),and the spiritual factor ("S" factor).en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Edith G. Davis.en
dc.format.extentxvi, 258 p. : ill.en
dc.format.extent132585 bytes
dc.format.extent680430 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.rightsBaylor University theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. Contact librarywebmaster@baylor.edu for inquiries about permission.en
dc.subjectPhysics -- Study and teaching (Middle school).en
dc.subjectCurriculum evaluation --- United States - Case studies.en
dc.titleA study of the effects of an experimental spiral physics curriculum taught to sixth grade girls and boys.en
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.degreeEd.Den
dc.rights.accessrightsWorldwide accessen
dc.contributor.departmentCurriculum and Instruction.en


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