Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorRowatt, Wade C.
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Megan K.
dc.contributor.otherBaylor University. Dept. of Psychology and Neuroscience.en
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-08T18:47:01Z
dc.date.available2009-07-08T18:47:01Z
dc.date.copyright2009-05
dc.date.issued2009-07-08T18:47:01Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2104/5356
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 61-66).en
dc.description.abstractThe effects of religiosity on prosocial behavior have been examined in a variety of ways. For example, many researchers correlate self-reported religiosity and self-reported helpfulness. Alternatively, researchers examine the interaction between self-reported religiosity and social or time pressure on help offered. In the present study, the effects of self-reported religiosity and type of organization (religious vs. non-religious) on the number of hours offered to volunteer were examined. Individuals high in general religiosity offered significantly less help to both organizations than individuals low in general religiosity. This main effect remained when controlling for trait empathy. Individuals high in intrinsic religiosity also offered significantly less help to both organizations than individuals low in intrinsic religiosity, but only when trait empathy was statistically controlled. The results are discussed in light of an evolutionary model of religion and the benefits that prosocial behavior can provide for religious in-group members.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Megan K. Johnson.en
dc.format.extentvii, 66 p. : ill.en
dc.format.extent167759 bytes
dc.format.extent289446 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.rightsBaylor University theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. Contact librarywebmaster@baylor.edu for inquiries about permission.en
dc.subjectReligiousness.en
dc.subjectVoluntarism -- Religious aspects.en
dc.subjectAssociations, institutuions, etc.en
dc.subjectReligious institutions.en
dc.subjectIntergroup relations.en
dc.subjectPsychology, Religious.en
dc.titleReligiosity and helping : do religious individuals volunteer more help to religious organizations than non-religious organizations?en
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.degreeM.A.en
dc.rights.accessrightsWorldwide accessen
dc.contributor.departmentPsychology and Neuroscience.en


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record