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dc.contributor.advisorNorth, Charles
dc.contributor.authorMcCallum, Matthew
dc.contributor.otherBaylor University.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-29T19:45:53Z
dc.date.available2012-04-29T19:45:53Z
dc.date.copyright2012
dc.date.issued2012-04-29
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2104/8326
dc.description.abstractIllegal downloading of music files has plagued the recording industry for years and stricter enforcement of piracy laws has shown little effectiveness in slowing this phenomenon. This paper studies the effect that religion and morality have on illegal downloading practices of music files by college students at a large private Christian university. I conclude that church attendance is associated with lower illegal downloading only for very frequent attenders. Also, students who rate their morals above average are less likely to illegally download than those who self-identified with average or below average morals. Additionally I examine four other “wrong” acts: copying homework, breaking the speed limit, shoplifting, and underage drinking. The results suggest that college students view underage drinking and illegal downloading as morally equivalent.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsBaylor University projects are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. Contact libraryquestions@baylor.edu for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.subjectEconomicsen_US
dc.subjectIllegal Downloadingen_US
dc.subjectEconometric Analysisen_US
dc.titleThe Pirate's Moral Compass: Religion, Morality, Underage Drinking, and Illegal Music Downloadingen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.rights.accessrightsWorldwide accessen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEconomicsen_US
dc.contributor.schoolshonors collegeen_US


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