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dc.contributor.advisorKeele, N. Bradley
dc.contributor.authorShan, Elaine
dc.contributor.otherBaylor University.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-03T16:21:32Z
dc.date.available2012-05-03T16:21:32Z
dc.date.copyright2012
dc.date.issued2012-05-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2104/8354
dc.description.abstractMusic is often thought of as a nonverbal language, capable of communicating emotional messages. Areas of the brain have been identified that, when damaged, affect only musical skills. At the same time, while the initial sensation of the sounds that make up music is a predominantly auditory experience, the neural basis of music perception lies in several different areas of the brain and overlaps with those used in language, emotion, and motor tasks. Thus music is a complex experience that utilizes seemingly divergent abilities of the brain. This thesis will describe the systems level processing of music perception and implications for music therapy.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsBaylor University projects are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. Contact libraryquestions@baylor.edu for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.subjectMusic.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology.en_US
dc.subjectLanguage.en_US
dc.subjectEmotion.en_US
dc.subjectMotor skills.en_US
dc.titleMusic and the Mind: How the Brain is Affected by Musicen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.rights.accessrightsWorldwide accessen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychology and Neuroscienceen_US
dc.contributor.schoolshonors collegeen_US


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