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dc.contributor.advisorWeaver, Charles
dc.contributor.authorCliburn, Rachel
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-08T16:00:08Z
dc.date.available2012-05-08T16:00:08Z
dc.date.copyright2012
dc.date.issued2012-05-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2104/8398
dc.description.abstractMetacomprehension refers to a person’s ability to monitor what information has been learned through reading. Good metacomprehension is important for efficient studying. Prior research shows that most readers demonstrate quite poor metacomprehension. Ironically, making texts easier to read, for example, by underlining important ideas, impair metacognition. In the present experiment, we explored whether reading an underlined text or a plain text produces better pretest and posttest metacomprehension judgments. Consistent with prior research, although overall test accuracy was the same between conditions, the more difficult plain text condition improved the accuracy of metacomprehension judgments compared to the underline group.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsBaylor University projects are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. Contact libraryquestions@baylor.edu for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.titleThe Effect of Annotation on Metacomprehension of Texten_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.rights.accessrightsWorldwide access.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychology and Neuroscienceen_US
dc.contributor.schoolshonors collegeen_US


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