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dc.contributor.advisorJones, Kenneth R., Ph. D.
dc.contributor.authorSturdy, Michael C.
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-29T16:26:24Z
dc.date.available2012-11-29T16:26:24Z
dc.date.copyright2012-08
dc.date.issued2012-11-29
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2104/8523
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the relationship between Gaius (Caligula) and his Jewish subjects via unrest in Alexandria and the emperor’s decree that the Jerusalem Temple be converted into a pagan shrine. It is concluded that Gaius was a competent leader who intentionally asserted his power over the region of Judea based on his knowledge of the Jewish people based on their history and his relationship with Agrippa I. It is also concluded that the Jewish authors’ view of the emperor was tainted predominately by the Temple incident, which has shaped how historians have studied Gaius by focusing on his madness and immorality.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisheren
dc.rightsBaylor University theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. Contact librarywebmaster@baylor.edu for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.subjectCaligula.en_US
dc.subjectRome.en_US
dc.subjectJudea.en_US
dc.titleCaligula in Jerusalem : the hostile relationship between Emperor Gaius and his Jewish subjects.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.A.en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsWorldwide accessen_US
dc.contributor.departmentHistory.en_US
dc.contributor.schoolsBaylor University. Dept. of History.en_US


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