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dc.contributor.advisorFerraro, Joseph
dc.contributor.authorFrancis, Kelsea
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-21T14:24:26Z
dc.date.available2018-05-21T14:24:26Z
dc.date.copyright2018
dc.date.issued2018-05-21
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2104/10224
dc.description.abstractThe qualifications of expert witnesses are under scrutiny following the Daubert ruling. However, there is little consensus as to what defines an expert in a forensic field. There is no designated definition of ‘expert’ that courts use to determine whether someone is qualified enough to be an expert witness, but level of education and years of experience are important factors. This work is a preliminary analysis of the rate of skill acquisition in regards to saw mark, or kerf mark, analysis. Some kerf marks could be learned and expertly identified by analysts in as little as 5 minutes, whereas other kerfs could not, even after 30 minutes of preparation. Our findings suggest that there are some concepts within kerf mark analysis that can be mastered with high accuracy and others that cannot.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsBaylor University projects are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. Contact libraryquestions@baylor.edu for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.subjectSaw marks.en_US
dc.subjectKerf marks.en_US
dc.subjectSkill acquisition in forensics.en_US
dc.subjectExpert status in forensics.en_US
dc.subjectKerf class.en_US
dc.subjectForensics.en_US
dc.subjectForensic class identification.en_US
dc.titleSkill Acquisition in Saw Kerf Class Identificationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.rights.accessrightsWorldwide accessen_US
dc.contributor.departmentAnthropology.en_US
dc.contributor.schoolshonors collegeen_US


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