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dc.contributor.advisorMartens, Paul Henry.
dc.contributor.authorColeman, R. Holland
dc.contributor.otherBaylor University.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-21T17:05:23Z
dc.date.available2018-05-21T17:05:23Z
dc.date.copyright2018-05-04
dc.date.issued2018-05-21
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2104/10314
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores the ways that Christians can contend for justice in a globalized world at the same time that they are complicit in structural injustice. This thesis first argues that throughout the Scriptural witness justice is characterized as the individual’s care for the neighbor. Next, it demonstrates how structures at the local level mediate relationship between individuals. Third, it argues that the American church in general is ill-equipped to deal with these issues because it has been misshaped by individualism and consumerism, and the practice of material sharing is recommended as a corrective. Finally, this thesis draws upon the work of Wendell Berry and Wes Jackson to argue that an economy of place embodies the biblical concept of justice as care. The argument concludes with a proposal for local church bodies to invest in just structures within their own cities.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsBaylor University projects are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. Contact libraryquestions@baylor.edu for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.titleLocal Church Responses to Structural Injusticeen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.rights.accessrightsWorldwide accessen_US
dc.contributor.departmentReligion.en_US
dc.contributor.schoolsHonors College.en_US


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