Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorElkins, Gary Ray, 1952-
dc.creatorJohnson, Alisa J., 1980-
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-07T13:33:18Z
dc.date.available2018-09-07T13:33:18Z
dc.date.created2018-08
dc.date.issued2018-07-16
dc.date.submittedAugust 2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2104/10437
dc.description.abstractPain is a growing public healthcare challenge that affects millions each year. Despite recent scientific advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pain, pain is often undertreated. Undertreated pain is associated with higher rates of developing comorbid chronic diseases, mental health issues, chronic pain, and disability. There is growing scientific support for the use of arts-based mind-body interventions, such as music and suggestions, in multidisciplinary pain management. However, it is largely unknown how, and for whom, these treatments may be most beneficial. It has been proposed that music and suggestions may be an effective adjunct in pain management through multiple psychological mechanisms, including relaxation, emotion, distraction, self-efficacy, expectation and absorption. The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of music and suggestion to music alone on pain, and to explore possible mechanisms for their action. Sixty-six college-aged females were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial comparing music listening combine with positive suggestions to music listening and a no-treatment control on cold pressor pain. Participants completed a battery of psychological and physiological measures to provide further insight into the possible variables related to the observed effects of music and suggestion on pain. The results of this study indicate that music with or without suggestion may be beneficial in improving certain dimensions of pain. A discussion of the implications and limitations of these findings follows.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectPain. Music. Suggestion. Experimental.
dc.titleMusic and suggestion : an exploration of the effects and mechanisms of an arts-based mind-body intervention for pain.
dc.typeThesis
dc.rights.accessrightsNo access - Contact librarywebmaster@baylor.edu
dc.type.materialtext
thesis.degree.namePh.D.
thesis.degree.departmentBaylor University. Dept. of Psychology & Neuroscience.
thesis.degree.grantorBaylor University
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
dc.date.updated2018-09-07T13:33:19Z
local.embargo.lift2023-08-01
local.embargo.terms2023-08-01
dc.creator.orcid0000-0003-4287-8703


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record