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dc.contributor.advisorGerow, Stephanie L.
dc.creatorAvery, Suzannah Kathryn, 1994-
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-25T14:38:43Z
dc.date.available2019-01-25T14:38:43Z
dc.date.created2018-12
dc.date.issued2018-10-08
dc.date.submittedDecember 2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2104/10510
dc.description.abstractSelection of demands without a demand assessment could result in a failure to identify an escape function for escape-maintained challenging behavior. Demands may be categorized into two categories: low-aversive and high-aversive demands. Low-aversive demands are demands associated with little or no challenging behavior and high-aversive demands are demands associated with frequent or high rates of challenging behavior. High-aversive demands identified in the demand assessment are typically used in the subsequent assessment and treatment of challenging behavior.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectDemand assessment. Challenging behavior.
dc.titleThe use of demand assessments in the assessment and treatment of challenging behavior.
dc.typeThesis
dc.rights.accessrightsWorldwide access
dc.type.materialtext
thesis.degree.nameM.A.
thesis.degree.departmentBaylor University. Dept. of Educational Psychology.
thesis.degree.grantorBaylor University
thesis.degree.levelMasters
dc.date.updated2019-01-25T14:38:44Z


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