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dc.contributor.advisorButler, Clay, Dr.
dc.contributor.authorKim, Esther
dc.contributor.otherBaylor University.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-22T13:01:21Z
dc.date.available2020-05-22T13:01:21Z
dc.date.copyright2020
dc.date.issued2020-05-22
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2104/10892
dc.description.abstractOne of the fundamental differences between spoken and written conversation is that synchronicity is optional in written conversations. In other words, while spoken conversations must proceed continuously in real time, written conversations may proceed periodically if chosen to be so by the interlocutors. Other crucial differences such as lack of paralinguistic cues (e.g. body language, tone, rate of speech) in textual communication change the construction of expectations in conversations among the interlocutors compared to conventional oral conversation. In conversations where the expectation of synchronicity has not been clearly established, texters implicitly discern whether a conversation is meant to be synchronous or asynchronous. This thesis analyzes sets of text message conversations using the conversation analysis approach to examine the ways in which the texters strategically judge the synchronicity of the conversation. While the success of the discernment was evaluated in terms of Burgoon and Hale’s Expectation Violation Theory (1988) and Brown and Levinson’s politeness theory (1987), the main factors of contribution to the discernment showed to be the urgency, goal, and spontaneity of the conversation.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsBaylor University projects are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. Contact libraryquestions@baylor.edu for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.subjectText conversation.en_US
dc.subjectSynchronicity.en_US
dc.subjectConversation analysis.en_US
dc.subjectFace theory.en_US
dc.subjectText messaging.en_US
dc.titleAnalysis of Synchronicity Discernment in Text Conversationsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.rights.accessrightsWorldwide accessen_US
dc.contributor.departmentLanguage and Linguistics.en_US


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