Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorHanchey, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorDonnelly, Rachel
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-24T22:02:37Z
dc.date.available2022-08-24T22:02:37Z
dc.date.copyright2022
dc.date.issued2022-08-24
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2104/12114
dc.description.abstractThis thesis situates Cicero's discussion of otium in his De Oratore within the Roman understanding of memoria. Cicero's presentation of otium, often translated as "leisure," offers the promise of a nation state that thrives without being at war. Chapter One discusses the link between the Roman moral system, the mos maiorum, and a narrative of self-understanding presented through exempla. This chapter defines Roman memoria as the holding place of exempla. Chapter Two will address Cicero’s discussion of memoria in the introduction of his philosophical work, the de Oratore. Finally, Chapter Three will address the type of otium that Cicero models in this dialogue and its influence upon Roman memoria.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsBaylor University projects are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. Contact libraryquestions@baylor.edu for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.titleState of Eternal Rest: Roman Memoria and Ciceronian Otiumen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.rights.accessrightsWorldwide accessen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity Scholars.en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record