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dc.contributor.advisorCorey, David D.
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Natalie
dc.contributor.otherBaylor University.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-24T20:07:53Z
dc.date.available2013-05-24T20:07:53Z
dc.date.copyright2013
dc.date.issued2013-05-24
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2104/8642
dc.description.abstractWhich is more important: a perfectly flourishing city or a perfectly free individual? All societies at all times and in all places deal with this tension. This thesis looks at thinkers who have answered this question at different points along a political continuum. Plato’s Republic can serve as a thought experiment that allows us to look at the civic end of the continuum. On the other, individualistic end, I look at both J.S. Mill’s On Liberty and F.A. Hayek’s The Road to Serfdom as descriptions of different ways to orient society solely for the purpose of increasing individual freedom. Near the middle of these two extremes lies the society that I find Socrates imagining in the Apology and the Crito. The primary purpose of this thesis is to analyze these various points along this continuum between civic health and individual freedom.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsBaylor University projects are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. Contact libraryquestions@baylor.edu for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical philosophy.en_US
dc.subjectPlato.en_US
dc.subjectHayeck.en_US
dc.subjectJohn Stuart Mill.en_US
dc.titleCivic Flourishing and Individual Freedom: The Political Tensionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.rights.accessrightsWorldwide accessen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPolitical Science.en_US
dc.contributor.schoolsHonors College.en_US


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