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dc.contributor.advisorKendrick, James, 1974-
dc.contributor.authorWucher, Joshua.
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-11T14:24:35Z
dc.date.available2014-06-11T14:24:35Z
dc.date.copyright2014-05
dc.date.issued2014-06-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2104/9116
dc.description.abstractThis thesis investigates the effects of transmedia storytelling on Hollywood franchises through a case study of the four X-Men films and the comic book series The Uncanny X-Men. This thesis shows how the adaptive process that transforms the character of Magneto from morally ambiguous comic book anti-hero to a more streamlined movie supervillain is illustrative of the two-edged approach of transmedia theory. It elucidates why transmedia franchises are economically and artistically advantageous, while concurrently having the potential to dilute narrative and thematic complexity. This analysis concludes that transmedia narratives can enrich popular culture, but also risk falling into the traps of formulaic storytelling, which could detrimentally affect artistic production.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisheren
dc.rightsBaylor University theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. Contact librarywebmaster@baylor.edu for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.subjectTransmedia storytelling.en_US
dc.subjectX-Men.en_US
dc.subjectFilm franchise.en_US
dc.subjectFilm industry.en_US
dc.titleThe building of the X-men transmedia franchise and how expansive storytelling is affecting Hollywood.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.A.en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsWorldwide access.en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsAccess changed 8/20/19.
dc.contributor.departmentCommunication.en_US
dc.contributor.schoolsBaylor University. Dept. of Communication.en_US


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