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dc.contributor.advisorCorey, David D.
dc.contributor.authorMaass, Matthew
dc.contributor.otherBaylor University.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-20T17:01:29Z
dc.date.available2015-05-20T17:01:29Z
dc.date.copyright2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2104/9269
dc.description.abstractNonintervention is the principle in international relations that prohibits states from interfering in the internal affairs of another. This norm faces challenges in the form of interventionist policies that seek to end civil wars and their human costs. I propose that nonintervention is the best default policy for the international system. Nonintervention serves to both respect states relationship with their citizens and to provide stability in the international state system. But, it is only a guide and in situations where it fails to provide for the end it was meant to, it may become more prudent to suspend the norm in favor of intervention. One of the goals of my thesis is to discern the situations in which to suspend the principle of nonintervention.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsBaylor University projects are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. Contact libraryquestions@baylor.edu for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.subjectNonintervention.en_US
dc.subjectInterventionen_US
dc.subjectHumanitarian Intervention.en_US
dc.subjectCounter-Intervention.en_US
dc.subjectCivil Wars.en_US
dc.titleNonintervention and its Possible Exceptions: International Society's Response to Civil Waren_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.rights.accessrightsWorldwide access.en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsAccess changed 5/26/17.
dc.contributor.departmentPolitical Science.en_US
dc.contributor.schoolshonors collegeen_US


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