Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorSmith, Alden
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Casey
dc.contributor.otherBaylor University.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-28T19:45:54Z
dc.date.available2015-05-28T19:45:54Z
dc.date.copyright2015-04-30
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2104/9368
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines poem 64, the longest poem written by Catullus, and analyzes its internal structure as well as the allusions made to Apollonius Rhodius’ Argonautica and Euripides’ Medea. While Catullus is perhaps more well known for his love poems to Lesbia, C. 64 gives a unique insight into the poet’s personal interpretation of other works, as well as his outlook on love, sorrow, and the accompanying emotions. This poem narrates the wedding of Peleus and Thetis, the parents of the hero Achilles. On the marriage bed lays a purple coverlet, which retells the sorrowful love story of Theseus, the Athenian prince and Ariadne, the princess of Crete. Though, given their contrasting images of love, these two couples seem incompatible, I will show how they are analogous through paradoxes and parallels within the structure of the poem. In addition, I will examine the allusions to the Medea and Argonautica, considering how Catullus has used these works to forge a place for his name within poetic tradition.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsBaylor University projects are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. Contact libraryquestions@baylor.edu for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.subjectClassicsen_US
dc.subjectCatullusen_US
dc.titleWeaving the Labyrinth: Paradoxes and Parallels in Catullus 64en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.rights.accessrightsWorldwide accessen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity Scholar.en_US
dc.contributor.schoolshonors collegeen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record