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dc.contributor.advisorFunderburk, Kevin
dc.contributor.authorOusley, Britt
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-24T15:47:31Z
dc.date.available2015-06-24T15:47:31Z
dc.date.copyright2015-05-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2104/9408
dc.description.abstractIn the first four centuries of this era, Christians of the Greek-speaking Roman world displayed a range of attitudes toward rituals and behaviors that they labeled as "magical," i.e. as mageia, goeteia, or pharmakeia. Christian responses to these phenomena and the related terminology range from outright condemnation to self-description. This thesis examines the use of words pertaining to "magical" practice in literature from the first several centuries of the Church, including passages from the didactic texts of the Apostolic Fathers, the novelistic Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles, and the stories regarding Jesus in the Apocryphal Gospels. Patterns of behaviors and contexts associated with Greek "magical" vocabulary are explored in these texts in order to argue that these authors believed their sacraments were in direct conflict, even combat, with the demonically driven, "magical" sacraments of pagan religion.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsBaylor University projects are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. Contact libraryquestions@baylor.edu for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.subjectMagicen_US
dc.titleMagic, Sorcery, and Sacraments: Combating and Using the Supernatural in Ancient Christian Literatureen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.rights.accessrightsWorldwide access.en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsAccess changed 8/3/17.
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity Scholars.en_US
dc.contributor.schoolsHonors College.en_US


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