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dc.contributor.advisorWhite, David J.
dc.contributor.authorSchenck, Catherine
dc.contributor.otherBaylor University.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-25T15:31:09Z
dc.date.available2015-06-25T15:31:09Z
dc.date.copyright2015-05-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2104/9428
dc.description.abstractAlthough women in antiquity are often perceived as suppressed and inferior by modern readers, Roman women played specific roles in society. They were daughters, brides, matronae, and priestesses. Each woman performed her own responsibilities, fulfilled her societal expectations, and wore a specific costume. Clothes and hair adornment were key features in distinguishing the levels of social and moral hierarchy within the Roman world. They could symbolize a transition from one phase of life to another or idealistic qualities, such chastity, modesty, purity, and pudicitia. Using my own translations of ancient authors, unless otherwise noted, and the visual representations of women in art, this thesis analyzes how the costumes of two categories of ordinary women, young girls and matronae, and two categories of extra-ordinary women, brides and the Vestal Virgins, reflect their status, social and economical class, and identity.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsBaylor University projects are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. Contact libraryquestions@baylor.edu for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.subjectThe Costume of Roman Womenen_US
dc.titleDressing the Part: The Costume of Roman Womenen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.rights.accessrightsWorldwide access.
dc.contributor.departmentClassics.en_US
dc.contributor.schoolshonors collegeen_US


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