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dc.contributor.advisorFlavin, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorTandy, Lewis
dc.contributor.otherBeckwith, Francis.en_US
dc.contributor.otherBaylor University.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-25T16:08:26Z
dc.date.available2015-06-25T16:08:26Z
dc.date.copyright2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2104/9442
dc.description.abstractIn US v. Windsor (2013) the Supreme Court ruled that Section 3 of DOMA violates the Fifth Amendment Equal Protection Clause, meaning the federal government can no longer refuse to recognize same-sex marriages that are deemed legal under state law. Some scholars argue Windsor foreshadows the inevitable demise of Section 2 of DOMA, which currently permits a state to both define marriage as between one man and one woman and to refuse to recognize same-sex marriages consecrated outside its boundaries. On the contrary, in this thesis I will argue that Section 2 of DOMA is perfectly consistent with both constitutional and legal precedent, as well as the decision made in Windsor. Furthermore, Windsor has no dire implications on a state’s right to define marriage when one considers principles of federalism.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsBaylor University projects are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. Contact libraryquestions@baylor.edu for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.subjectSame-Sex Marriage.en_US
dc.subjectDefense of Marriage Act.en_US
dc.subjectDOMA.en_US
dc.subjectGay Marriage.en_US
dc.subjectUnited States v Windsor.en_US
dc.subjectWindsor.en_US
dc.titleLooking Forward: What are the Implications of Windsor on Section 2 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA)?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.rights.accessrightsWorldwide accessen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPolitical Science.en_US
dc.contributor.schoolsHonors College.en_US


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