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dc.contributor.advisorFulton, Deirdre
dc.contributor.authorShipley, Laryssa
dc.contributor.otherBaylor University.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-11T18:32:20Z
dc.date.available2016-08-11T18:32:20Z
dc.date.copyright2016
dc.date.issued2016-08-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2104/9770
dc.description.abstractThe image of the snake evokes the same terror and awe today as it did in the ancient Mediterranean world. In the mythology, literature, and religious traditions of the Greek and Roman sphere, snakes were understood to exhibit benevolent and malevolent characteristics simultaneously: they symbolized the fertility of a mother goddess in the Roman cult of Isis, they were harbingers of prophetic doom in Virgil’s tale of the destruction of Troy, they were healers in the Greek and Roman cult of Aesclepius, and they envenomated travelers in Aesop’s famous fables. Snakes also provide a link to the Underworld, and, by doing so, control the realms of life, death, and rebirth. Snakes guarded the omphalos, the “navel” or center of the world. Above all snakes embodied power because they were both commonplace and deified, as well as universally feared in the ancient Mediterranean world. By the time of the first century Roman writer Virgil, all of the aforementioned images of snakes were used to depict power, both benevolent and malevolent.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsBaylor University projects are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. Contact libraryquestions@baylor.edu for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.subjectArchaeology.en_US
dc.subjectSnakes.en_US
dc.subjectClassics.en_US
dc.subjectSerpents.en_US
dc.subjectMediterranean.en_US
dc.subjectMinoan.en_US
dc.subjectRome.en_US
dc.subjectCrete.en_US
dc.subjectGreece.en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology.en_US
dc.subjectMythology.en_US
dc.subjectReligion.en_US
dc.subjectVirgil.en_US
dc.subjectLiterature.en_US
dc.subjectRoman cults.en_US
dc.titleSerpentine Images of Power: Benevolent and Malevolent Depictions of Snakes in the Minoan, Greek, and Roman Worlden_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.rights.accessrightsWorldwide access.en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsAccess changed 7/11/18.
dc.contributor.departmentAnthropology.en_US
dc.contributor.schoolsHonors College.en_US


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