Enactivism, the Regression of Medicalized Rhetoric and Transdiagnostic Treatment Approaches in Psychological Care

dc.contributor.advisorSpitzer-Hanks, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorMessina, Madison
dc.contributor.departmentNeuroscience.
dc.contributor.otherBaylor University.en
dc.contributor.schoolsHonors College - Honors Programen
dc.date.accessioned2024-05-15T20:37:08Z
dc.date.available2024-05-15T20:37:08Z
dc.date.copyright2024
dc.date.issued2024-05-02
dc.description.abstractUnfortunately, our contemporary understanding of science has condemned psychology for being a ‘soft’ discipline. This perception, in part, is rooted in the historical challenges experienced by psychology as a field of study, where explanations for human behavior were frequently attributed to experiences of divine intervention and demonic possession. Consequently, to build a respectable reputation, psychology has had to overcompensate through developments of flawed transdiagnostic and biomedical treatment approaches that rely on medicalized rhetoric, limiting a client’s agency in treatment decisions, and baseline frameworks that operate under the inaccurate assumption of there being a normal and abnormal functioning human brain. However, through a unique integration of the physiological, experiential, sociocultural, and existential dimension, the methodology of enactivism serves as a representation for how future adaptations in psychological treatment can successfully possess the intricacies required to navigate the depth of complexity behind the human brain. Nevertheless, modern psychology along with its ‘mental’ health practices stands at a crucial junction today, begging the question: will psychology reset its narrative or continue optimizing the industry it has created?
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2104/12672
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsBaylor University projects are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. Contact libraryquestions@baylor.edu for inquiries about permission.en
dc.rights.accessrightsWorldwide access
dc.subjectThe brain from a humanities perspective.
dc.titleEnactivism, the Regression of Medicalized Rhetoric and Transdiagnostic Treatment Approaches in Psychological Care
dc.typeThesisen

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