Association Between Sleep Duration and Components of Metabolic Syndrome in Young Adults

dc.contributor.advisorGordon, Paul M., 1960-
dc.contributor.authorSmeding, Sonja
dc.contributor.departmentBiology.en_US
dc.contributor.otherBaylor University.en_US
dc.contributor.schoolsHonors College.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-21T16:44:30Z
dc.date.available2018-05-21T16:44:30Z
dc.date.copyright2018
dc.date.issued2018-05-21
dc.description.abstractMetabolic Syndrome (MS), which is the clustering of several cardiovascular risk factors, has become a growing concern in today’s society resulting in an increasing prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. Once observed only in older adults, metabolic syndrome is now highly prevalent across the life span. Insufficient sleep duration has been suggested to play a role in the development of metabolic syndrome, thus it is desirable to look more closely at the effects of sleep duration on each individual risk factor. A total of 55 subjects (51% male, ages 18 – 26) were recruited and participated in this study. Their 7-day sleep duration was obtained using SenseWear equipment. Subject data collected on the participants’ waist circumference, BMI, fasting blood glucose, fasting high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting triglycerides, and blood pressure, which are MS variables under the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) criteria, were obtained along with fat mass, body fat percentage, lean body mass, and calculated fat mass index. Sleep duration was positively correlated with triglycerides, fat mass, body fat percentage, and fat mass index, while negatively correlated with systolic blood pressure and lean body mass. The negative correlation with systolic blood pressure and lean body mass was lost when gender was controlled for. There were no correlations found for any of the other MS variables. These data suggest that although sleep duration did not correlate with metabolic syndrome using the NCEP ATP III definition in this inclusion controlled sample of young adults, the positive relationship observed between sleep and excess body fat, a known contributor of metabolic and cardiovascular risk, is cause for future concern.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2104/10271
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsBaylor University projects are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. Contact libraryquestions@baylor.edu for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsWorldwide access.en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsAccess changed 7/31/20.
dc.subjectAssociation Between Sleep Duration and Components of Metabolic Syndrome in Young Adultsen_US
dc.titleAssociation Between Sleep Duration and Components of Metabolic Syndrome in Young Adultsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US

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