The Proposed Importance of Chemosensation in Mating in Aedes Species

dc.contributor.advisorPitts, Jason
dc.contributor.authorBradford, Hanna
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity Scholars.en_US
dc.contributor.otherBaylor University.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-18T18:07:50Z
dc.date.available2022-05-18T18:07:50Z
dc.date.copyright2022-05-05
dc.date.issued2022-05-18
dc.description.abstractCurrently, mosquito-borne diseases are affecting billions of people worldwide and disproportionally burden the developing world. Despite control efforts, these diseases remain widespread. Studying chemosensation and mating behaviors in mosquito species allows for the development of novel control methods as well as understanding the population dynamics of cohabiting species. The goal of our re3search is to understand mating behavior in these species and the potential role of chemical detection in promoting mating within a species (conspecific), while also inhibiting mating across species (heterospecific). We propose that gustatory receptors are crucial to conspecific recognition and, ultimately, mating specificity. To determine whether Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti would produce viable offspring, mating assays were performed. After four days, microscopic observation of spermathecae, the female sperm storage organ, was used as a metric for determining mating behavior. Out of the 300 spermathecae sampled, we found evidence of high conspecific mating but no evidence of heterospecific mating. Furthermore, these findings suggest that wild Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti populations do not possess satyrization potential. To identify candidate GRs in Ae. Aegypti and Ae. Albopictus, their genomes were compared to GR sequences from Drosophila melanogaster using BLAST searches. RNA sequencing data confirms that candidate GRs are being expressed in tarsi and labella of both sexes. Despite published accounts of satyrization in some wild populations of Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti, we found no evidence in a local population. Our research provides a foundation for future genetic studies that can experimentally test the hypothesis that GRs are involved in mate recognition between these two closely related species.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2104/11780
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsBaylor University projects are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. Contact libraryquestions@baylor.edu for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.accessrightsNo access - Contact librarywebmaster@baylor.eduen_US
dc.subjectBiologyen_US
dc.subjectChemosensationen_US
dc.subjectMating Biologyen_US
dc.subjectAedes speciesen_US
dc.titleThe Proposed Importance of Chemosensation in Mating in Aedes Speciesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
Files
Original bundle
Now showing 1 - 2 of 2
No Thumbnail Available
Name:
BradfordHanna-Formatted-FINAL.pdf
Size:
1.17 MB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format
Description:
No Thumbnail Available
Name:
3_honors_college_agreement.pdf
Size:
114.9 KB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format
Description:
License bundle
Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
No Thumbnail Available
Name:
license.txt
Size:
1.87 KB
Format:
Item-specific license agreed upon to submission
Description: