Islam, sex, and sect: a quantitative look at women's rights in the Middle East.

Date
2008-05
Authors
González, Alessandra L.
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Abstract

In this paper I analyze Islamic Social Attitudes Survey (ISAS) data to see the effects of religious tradition and religious practice on attitudes about women’s rights among 1139 college students in Kuwait. Specifically, I test whether religious sect, religious school of thought, political identity, religious experience, religious salience, and religious practice have direct effects on women’s rights attitudes, while controlling for gender, in a majority-Muslim context. My findings show that gender, sect, religious school of thought, and political identity but not religious practice have persistent effects on attitudes about women’s rights.

Description
Includes bibliographical references (p. 34-36).
Keywords
Women's rights -- Religious aspects --- Islam., Women's rights --- Kuwait., Women in politics --- Kuwait., College students --- Kuwait -- Attitudes., College students --- Kuwait -- Religious life.
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